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Families and Children

    Results: 67

  • Abuse Counseling (10)
    RP-1400.8000-020

    Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020

    Programs that provide individual, conjoint, family or group treatment for people who are experiencing physical, sexual, emotional and/or other forms of abuse in the context a marital, parental, sibling or other family relationship or, in some instances, outside the family. Included are programs that provide therapeutic interventions for perpetrators and/or for individuals who have been victimized.
  • Adoption Counseling and Support (4)
    PH-0300.0300

    Adoption Counseling and Support

    PH-0300.0300

    Programs that provide guidance and support for people who have adopted a child or are involved in the process of adopting a child.
  • Adult/Child Mentoring Programs (1)
    PH-1400.5000-100

    Adult/Child Mentoring Programs

    PH-1400.5000-100

    Programs like Big Brothers or Big Sisters which provide male or female adult companionship, guidance and/or role models for young men or women who are from families in which adult figures of the same sex are absent or available on a limited and inadequate basis or who are troubled and at risk for delinquency. Also included are programs in which people in their teens provide companionship for younger children.
  • Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (4)
    YF-5000.1700-050

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    YF-5000.1700-050

    A neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development, has symptoms presenting in two or more settings (e.g. at home, school, or work; with friends or relatives; in other activities), and negatively impacts directly on social, academic or occupational functioning. Children with ADHD have difficulty focusing (picking something on which to pay attention), sustaining focus (paying attention for as long as is needed), and shifting focus (moving attention from one thing to another); tend to fidget, talk excessively or be constantly "on the go"; and speak and act on impulse rather than waiting their turn. Symptoms typically worsen in situations like the classroom that require sustained focus and self-application, and may be absent when the child is in a new or one-to-one situation. In the adult form of ADHD, the symptoms associated with hyperactivity may diminish while those related to inattention and impulsiveness persist. Adult symptoms may include lack of attention to detail, inability to maintain focus, poor listening skills, disorganization, forgetfulness, misplacing or losing things, being overwhelmed by tasks of daily living, difficulty sustaining friendships or intimate relationships, impulsive spending habits, restlessness, irritability, low tolerance for frustration, emotional outbursts and poor self esteem. There is no single test to diagnose ADHD, and many other problems, like sleep disorders, anxiety, depression, and certain types of learning disabilities, can have similar symptoms.
  • Bereaved Parent Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.1000-100

    Bereaved Parent Support Groups

    PN-8100.1000-100

    Mutual support groups whose members are parents who have experienced the loss of a child due to a miscarriage or stillbirth, or through illness or accident in infancy, during childhood or later in life. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and focus on helping participants accept their loss, express their grief, move through the bereavement process and put their lives back together. Included are groups for parents who have lost a child to sudden infant death syndrome, or whose children have been murdered.
  • Case/Care Management (5)
    PH-1000

    Case/Care Management

    PH-1000

    Programs that develop plans for the evaluation, treatment and/or care of individuals who, because of age, illness, disability or other difficulties, need assistance in planning and arranging for services; which assess the individual's needs; coordinate the delivery of needed services; ensure that services are obtained in accordance with the case plan; and follow up and monitor progress to ensure that services are having a beneficial impact on the individual. Case management is a collaborative process characterized by communication, advocacy and resource management to promote high quality, cost-effective interventions and outcomes.
  • Child Abuse Hotlines (3)
    RP-1500.1400-150

    Child Abuse Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-150

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for parents who have abused or fear they may abuse their children with the objective of defusing the parent's anger and frustration and ensuring the child's future safety through referrals for ongoing support and treatment. Also included may be services for abused children and concerned others who are in need of advice, guidance and/or emotional support. Hotline staff are generally available via telephone, email, chat and/or text.
  • Child Abuse Prevention (1)
    FN-1500.1900-150

    Child Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-150

    Programs, often offered in the schools or in other community settings, that attempt to protect children from physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse or exploitation through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with children and/or the community at large. The sessions may offer suggestions for children and/or parents regarding ways of avoiding or handling an abusive or potentially abusive situation and/or information about the indicators and incidence of abuse, requirements for reporting abuse and community resources that are available to children who have been abused and to their families.
  • Child Care Providers (8)
    PH-1250

    Child Care Providers

    PH-1250

    Programs that provide substitute parental care in a group setting for children during some portion of a 24-hour day. Services may include recreational and developmental activities and snacks and/or meals as appropriate.
  • Child Health and Disability Prevention Exams (3)
    LF-7000.1600

    Child Health and Disability Prevention Exams

    LF-7000.1600

    Health care providers that offer the Child Health and Disability Prevention Program, a health assessment and treatment program for low-income children and youth through age 21 that is designed to assure early detection, diagnosis and treatment of diseases or impairments which might adversely affect the individual's growth and development. CHDP exams generally include a complete physical examination; a dental assessment; a nutritional assessment; vision and hearing screening; immunizations; urine, blood and tuberculosis screening tests; specialized laboratory tests, as needed; and health education on topics such as tobacco use prevention, lead poisoning prevention and other issues pertaining to child health.
  • Children's Protective Services (2)
    PH-6500.1500

    Children's Protective Services

    PH-6500.1500

    Programs that investigate reports of child abuse, neglect or abandonment; document substantiated cases; provide for the temporary placement of children who, for their own protection, have been removed from the custody of the adults who are responsible for their care; work with families who are experiencing a problem with child abuse with the objective of facilitating continued family unification or reunification; and provide ongoing supportive services for children in permanent placement.
  • Clothing (10)
    BM-6500.1500

    Clothing

    BM-6500.1500

    Programs that pay for or provide new or secondhand clothing. Included are clothing exchange programs.
  • Clothing Donation Programs (3)
    TI-1800.1500

    Clothing Donation Programs

    TI-1800.1500

    Programs that accept new or secondhand clothing, repair the items if necessary, and keep the clothing for use in their own programs, donate it to shelters and other community-based organizations for distribution to the people they serve, or sell it to raise money for agency programs.
  • Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites (7)
    BD-5000.1500

    Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites

    BD-5000.1500

    Programs that provide hot meals on a regular basis primarily for older adults who may be at risk for nutritional deficits and social isolation without assistance. Congregate meals are often combined with recreational, educational and social activities, and programs may include access to health services and/or information. Some programs are also open to caregivers, spouses and/or adults with disabilities.
  • Day Camps (6)
    PL-6400.1500-180

    Day Camps

    PL-6400.1500-180

    Programs that provide creative recreational experiences in cooperative indoor and/or outdoor group living for children, usually age four to 13, or adults who are transported to the site each morning and who return to their homes at the end of each day. Transportation may be provided by the program or may be the responsibility of the family.
  • Developmental Assessment (9)
    LF-7000.1700

    Developmental Assessment

    LF-7000.1700

    Programs that provide a comprehensive, structured evaluation of a child's cognitive/intellectual functioning, language and communication skills, independent living skills, social and emotional development and perceptual/motor functioning in order to identify individuals who show developmental delays, determine the nature and extent of the problem and recommend a course of treatment and care. Developmental assessments are generally offered by a developmental assessment specialist, or a team of professionals that can include a pediatrician, language specialist, audiologist, occupational therapist, child psychologist and child psychiatrist, among others. They involve age-adjusted questions regarding a child's growth, physical movements, behavior, play, and interactions with family members and the rest of the world as well as a series of tests that may include a physical exam, hearing and eye screenings, play observation, and standardized tests that present the child with specific tasks to determine areas of strength and weakness. Developmental assessments are occasionally done for adults. They can also be used to identify individuals who have developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism and neurological impairments, in order to establish eligibility for state and federally funded programs.
  • Disability Associations (3)
    TN-1700

    Disability Associations

    TN-1700

    Organizations whose members are individuals who work in the disability field and have affiliated for the purpose of promoting mutual interests, participating in education and training conferences, interacting with other professionals and taking advantage of other opportunities for personal and professional development. Many disability associations also include individuals with disabilities and their families in their membership. Disability associations may also advocate for the rights of people with disabilities and their caregivers; promote legislation that funds research and services for this population; and provide information for members and the general public. Included are associations that focus on a specific disability such as autism or brain injuries; and those that address a broad range of disability issues.
  • Disease/Disability Information (6)
    LH-2700.1700

    Disease/Disability Information

    LH-2700.1700

    Programs that provide information about the causes and origins, preventive measures, symptoms, screening/diagnostic procedures, and/or methods of treatment or management including the latest research for specific illnesses or disabling conditions.
  • Domestic Violence Intervention Programs (5)
    FF-0500.9100-180

    Domestic Violence Intervention Programs

    FF-0500.9100-180

    Programs that offer classes or groups, sponsor victim panels or provide other interventions which help domestic violence offenders understand and take responsibility for their acts of violence and abuse; realize that their behavior is the result of their desire to gain power and control over their partner's life; and make a decision to stop their abuse by looking at the damaging effects of their actions on their relationships, partners, children and themselves. The group sessions address the tactics of power and control; describe the cycle of abuse; challenge stereotypical gender role expectations; and help abusers identify and articulate their feelings and recognize behavior, emotional and physical cues which signal escalating anger. Participants learn problem solving skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, stress management techniques, communication and listening skills and other skills that will help them develop and maintain positive, healthy partnerships; and may be ordered by the court to attend or self-refer. The victim panels provide a venue which enables volunteers who have been subjected to abuse to describe the treatment they have endured and the impact on their lives.
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (5)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for individuals, primarily women, who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women, where they are available.
  • Domestic/Family Violence Legal Services (3)
    FT-3000.1750

    Domestic/Family Violence Legal Services

    FT-3000.1750

    Programs that provide information and guidance and/or representation in court proceedings for individuals who have been abused in an intimate relationship and/or for people who are facing a summary conviction offence or criminal charge for perpetrating abuse. Included are domestic violence law clinics and other legal assistance programs that represent victims of domestic abuse at restraining order hearings or in other civil or criminal actions involving charges against an abuser. Most also represent the person's interests in complexities that arise as part of the legal process such as restitution, payment of debts or child support, custody and visitation and property control. Some programs may also represent victims of domestic abuse who have been charged with a crime and/or handle cases involving accusations of child abuse filed by one parent against the other, abuse of an elderly person by an adult child or abuse of an adult child by a parent.
  • Eating Disorders Treatment (11)
    RP-6400.1900

    Eating Disorders Treatment

    RP-6400.1900

    Multidisciplinary programs, often offered on an inpatient basis with post-discharge outpatient therapy, that provide comprehensive diagnostic and treatment services for individuals who have anorexia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, bulimia or a related eating disorder. Treatment depends on the specific type of eating disorder involved but typically involves psychotherapy, nutrition education, family counseling, medication and hospitalization, if required, to stabilize the patient's health.
  • Families/Friends of Sexual Assault/Abuse Survivors (1)
    YJ-7000

    Families/Friends of Sexual Assault/Abuse Survivors

    YJ-7000

    The parents, children, spouses, partners, friends or other relatives or significant others of survivors of rape or other forms of adult or child sexual abuse, whose own patterns of personal, social and familial coping have been significantly affected by the sexual assault.
  • Family Based Services (10)
    PH-2360

    Family Based Services

    PH-2360

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support healthy family development, improve the family's ability to resolve problems (such as poverty, unemployment, ill health, homelessness, substandard housing, educational difficulties, substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, delinquency and physical and developmental problems) and prevent the need for unnecessary placement of children in foster care, group homes, inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment programs, residential training schools or other alternative environments when family problems reach crisis proportions. Services may include home visiting services that focus on public health issues (especially prenatal), mental health and substance abuse counseling, home management instruction, success in a child care setting, parenting skills development, stress management, tutoring, pregnancy awareness and AIDS awareness; may be available to the community at large, to families at risk for dissolution or those currently in crisis; and may be offered by a single agency or a coalition of agencies that have agreed to provide services according to a coordinated case plan.
  • Family Counseling (35)
    RF-2000

    Family Counseling

    RF-2000

    Programs that offer therapeutic sessions that focus on the system of relationships and communication patterns among family members and which attempt to modify those relationships and patterns to achieve greater harmony. The therapist focuses on the family as a unit rather than concentrating on one of the members who is singled out as the person in need of treatment.
  • Family Crisis Shelters (5)
    BH-1800.1500-200

    Family Crisis Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-200

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for certain members of or entire families who are involved in or at risk for child abuse or neglect. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services that are related to child abuse including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Family Literacy Programs (3)
    HH-4500.2000

    Family Literacy Programs

    HH-4500.2000

    Programs offered by libraries, local literacy councils and other organizations that provide reading, writing and mathematics instruction which targets both parents and children. Included are Even Start programs, federally-funded intergenerational literacy programs for low-income families with children age eight or younger which integrate early childhood education, adult basic education/literacy programs, ESL, GED, and parenting education with the objective of breaking the cycle of poverty and illiteracy and providing both adults and children with essential life skills. The programs build on existing resources; focus on family/parent literacy, parenting skills and child development; and combine the efforts of a variety of local organizations including Head Start programs, libraries, literacy councils, local educational agencies, institutions of higher education and other public and nonprofit entities. Support services may include transportation, child care, nutrition assistance, meals, health care and referrals for employment services, mental health services, substance abuse and other identified needs.
  • Family Maintenance/Reunification (2)
    PH-6500.1500-200

    Family Maintenance/Reunification

    PH-6500.1500-200

    Programs that work with families who have an open child abuse case following emergency response or with families who have been identified as being at risk for child abuse or neglect with the objective of establishing a case plan for ongoing services which will allow the child to remain in the home or return to the home if previously removed. Services provided or coordinated for the family may include individual, group, family or conjoint counseling for the abusing and nonabusing parent(s), siblings, and/or the abused child; home management training; parenting skills training; shelter care; and/or respite care.
  • Family Violence Prevention (1)
    FN-1500.1900

    Family Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.1900

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of child abuse, elder abuse and spouse abuse in family settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses (5)
    BD-1875.2000

    Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses

    BD-1875.2000

    Programs that gather, sort, store and distribute to participating charitable agencies, surplus food products and edible but unmarketable food that has been acquired from growers, grocers and other sources. Also included are the supermarket chains, food manufacturers, wholesalers, restaurant suppliers, agencies that organize food drives, government departments (e.g., the USDA) and other organizations that donate food on a regular basis to food banks and/or directly to food pantries, meal programs, homeless shelters and other human service agencies with food programs.
  • Food Pantries (25)
    BD-1800.2000

    Food Pantries

    BD-1800.2000

    Programs that acquire food products through donations, canned food drives, food bank programs or direct purchase and distribute the food to people who are in emergency situations. Some pantries deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP (1)
    NL-6000.2000

    Food Stamps/SNAP

    NL-6000.2000

    A federally-funded program administered locally by the county or the state that enables low-income and indigent households to obtain an electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card similar to a bank debit card which can be used in most grocery stores to purchase food. Approved households are entitled to purchase a designated amount of food utilizing their cards based on net income and household size. Benefits are generally available in an EBT account within 30 days from the date an application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits.
  • Free School Supplies (4)
    HL-8120.7800-200

    Free School Supplies

    HL-8120.7800-200

    Programs that pay for or provide textbooks and other essential educational supplies at no cost for students who cannot afford to purchase them.
  • General Acute Care Hospitals (4)
    LL-3000.2500

    General Acute Care Hospitals

    LL-3000.2500

    Health care facilities that are licensed to operate 24 hours per day and offer diagnostic and treatment services as well as emergency and critical care services for people who have any of a variety of illnesses or injuries which require immediate, short-term intervention.
  • Head Start (1)
    HD-1800.3000

    Head Start

    HD-1800.3000

    A federally-funded child development program that provides educational experiences, medical and dental services, nutritional meals, counseling and opportunities for parental involvement to help prepare low-income children and children with disabilities age three to five to enter and succeed in school.
  • Health/Disability Related Counseling (6)
    RP-1400.8000-300

    Health/Disability Related Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-300

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance in a variety of settings for individuals who have a disability; who are concerned about or have any of a variety of illnesses, including those that may ultimately be fatal; or who have experienced the disabling or disfiguring effects of an illness, injury or surgery. The counseling may deal with the realities of having a disability or being ill, coping with their illness/disability, life adjustments required by their situation, and helping them evaluate their alternatives and make personal choices that will maximize their ability to function independently. Included are programs that provide counseling for individuals who have a family history of a particular health condition or disability and need assistance in coping with the emotional problems that are associated with having or being at risk for developing the condition.
  • HIV Testing (5)
    LF-4900.2400

    HIV Testing

    LF-4900.2400

    Programs that offer HIV tests which are used to identify individuals who have been infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and are at risk for developing AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) or which are used to measure progression of the disease in people known to be infected. The most common HIV screening test is the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) which most frequently uses peripheral blood drawn from the arm or a finger as a sample, but can also be conducted using serum, oral fluids or urine. Repeatedly reactive EIA tests are confirmed using the Western blot or the immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The most common test that is used to measure disease progression is the PCR (polymeraise chain reaction) or viral load test. Many programs that provide HIV testing also provide pre-testing and post-test counseling which includes information about AIDS/HIV, reducing risks for HIV transmission, emotional support to help the individual deal with the testing process and test results, and information about and referral to other AIDS-related services.
  • Home Delivered Meals (7)
    BD-5000.3500

    Home Delivered Meals

    BD-5000.3500

    Programs that prepare and regularly deliver meals to older adults, people with disabilities and others who have difficulties shopping and/or preparing food for themselves or traveling to a site where a meal is being served.
  • Homeless Youth (2)
    YV-3000.8000

    Homeless Youth

    YV-3000.8000

    Children or adolescents who have been abandoned by the adults responsible for their care or who have left their homes without notice or parental consent and who have no fixed place of residence.
  • Household Goods Donation Programs (4)
    TI-1800.3000

    Household Goods Donation Programs

    TI-1800.3000

    Programs that accept new or secondhand furniture, appliances, kitchenware, linens, cleaning supplies and other consumer products for use in the household, refurbish them if necessary, and keep them for use in their own programs, donate them to other community-based organizations for distribution to the people they serve, or sell them to raise money for agency programs.
  • Household Goods Vouchers (5)
    BM-3000.3000

    Household Goods Vouchers

    BM-3000.3000

    Programs that supply coupons that can be exchanged in designated thrift shops or nonprofit organizations for furniture, appliances, bedding and other household items.
  • Immunizations (4)
    LT-3400

    Immunizations

    LT-3400

    Programs that provide inoculations or other prophylactic measures to prevent susceptible individuals from contracting specific diseases for which means of control have been developed including immunizations recommended specifically for newborns and young children, booster shots to prevent the occurrence of childhood illnesses in adolescence and adulthood, inoculations recommended specifically for pregnant women and immunizations against illnesses such as shingles and pneumonia for older adults.
  • In Home Assistance (4)
    PH-3300

    In Home Assistance

    PH-3300

    Programs that provide assistance in performing routine household, yard and personal care activities for older adults, people with disabilities, eligible low income people, families whose normal routines have been disrupted by an emergency or others who need or want these services. The objective of in-home assistance is to help the recipient sustain independent living in a clean, safe and healthy home environment.
  • Individual Advocacy (8)
    FP-0500.3300

    Individual Advocacy

    FP-0500.3300

    Programs that intercede on behalf of individuals to help them establish eligibility for or obtain needed services when they have been denied benefits or services for which they are eligible, when they need assistance to communicate their needs to a service provider or to otherwise effectively represent themselves, or when they have a complaint about a service. Individual advocacy attempts to reach equitable settlements without resorting to litigation and seeks to meet individual needs without attempting to change social institutions.
  • Mental Health Associations (12)
    TD-1600.3100-550

    Mental Health Associations

    TD-1600.3100-550

    Organizations whose members are mental health service providers, consumers, parents and advocates who have affiliated for the purpose of improving mental health services, preventing mental illness, promoting social conditions which enhance the potential for good mental health and advocating for an environment of awareness and tolerance. Many mental health associations provide information about and referral to local mental health resources, public education regarding mental illness, advocacy, and technical assistance and training on issues affecting their members.
  • Military Family Support Groups (4)
    PN-8100.4500-550

    Military Family Support Groups

    PN-8100.4500-550

    Mutual support groups whose members are the spouses, children, parents, other relatives, boyfriends, girlfriends or friends of active duty military personnel who have needs, issues and problems that relate to the stresses of military life. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; help participants prepare for military mobilization or deployment; and allow them to share their experience, strengths and hopes to solve the problems they have in common and to address the quality of life issues that affect them all.
  • Occupational Therapy (5)
    LR-6200

    Occupational Therapy

    LR-6200

    Programs that evaluate the task performance skills of individuals who may be having difficulty engaging in self-care, work, play or leisure time activities and help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations). Occupational therapy services typically include an individualized evaluation, during which the individual/family and occupational therapist agree on the person's goals; customized intervention to improve the person's ability to perform daily activities and reach their goals; and an outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met. Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes.
  • Parent Counseling (5)
    RP-1400.8000-650

    Parent Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-650

    Programs that provide a wide variety of therapeutic interventions for parents who are experiencing emotional difficulties or conflicts concerning their role as parents. Included are individual or group counseling for one or both parents or conjoint parent counseling which focuses on and explores the mental, emotional or social problems of the individual(s) which contribute to their parenting problems.
  • Parenting Education (6)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • Play Therapy (5)
    RP-8000.6600

    Play Therapy

    RP-8000.6600

    Programs that utilize play as a form of catharsis to enable children to express feelings and emotions which, if allowed to build up, could cause or further maladjustment. Play therapy is also used as a tool for diagnosing the source of a child's difficulty.
  • Pregnancy Counseling (7)
    LJ-2000.6500

    Pregnancy Counseling

    LJ-2000.6500

    Programs that help people who are experiencing a crisis pregnancy resolve any social or personal problems that have arisen as a result of their pregnancy or the prospect of parenthood, and help them understand their conflicting emotions, put their feelings in perspective, evaluate their options and make a decision that right is for them.
  • Pregnancy Testing (5)
    LJ-2000.6750

    Pregnancy Testing

    LJ-2000.6750

    Programs that utilize laboratory procedures to determine whether an individual is pregnant or which provide access to devices for establishing pregnancy that people can use at home.
  • Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities (2)
    FT-1000.6600

    Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities

    FT-1000.6600

    Programs that provide assistance for individuals with disabilities who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law. Included are federally mandated programs that are part of the formal protection and advocacy system which includes Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights (PAIR) and the Client Assistance Program (CAP); and independent organizations that provide the same types of services. Protection and advocacy programs provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under federal and state laws, for all people with disabilities and endeavor to ensure full access to inclusive educational programs, financial entitlements, health care, accessible housing and productive employment opportunities. The programs maintain a presence in facilities that care for people with disabilities where they monitor, investigate and attempt to remedy adverse conditions. CAP agencies (many of which are housed within protection and advocacy offices) provide information and assistance for individuals seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act, including assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies.
  • Public Health (15)
    JP

    Public Health

    JP

    Programs that protect and improve the health of the population through comprehensive efforts at the community level to prevent, control and eradicate disease and disabilities; eliminate environmental health hazards; promote sanitary living conditions; and recognize, prevent and control conditions in the workplace that constitute health hazards or place workers at risk for accidents.
  • Public Libraries (2)
    TJ-4400.6500

    Public Libraries

    TJ-4400.6500

    Libraries supported by public and/or private funds which provide general library services without charge to all residents of a given community, district or region.
  • Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines (2)
    RP-1500.1400-700

    Runaway/Homeless Youth Helplines

    RP-1500.1400-700

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk of abuse. Included may be steps to ensure the youth's safety, information regarding the youth's rights and alternatives, and referrals for shelter, medical care, ongoing counseling or group support and other related services. Also included are programs that maintain a message relay system which allows runaways to contact their parents or other concerned individuals and receive messages from them. Helpline staff are generally available via telephone, email, chat and/or text.
  • Scouting Programs (2)
    PS-9800.8500

    Scouting Programs

    PS-9800.8500

    Programs that provide opportunities for children and youth to develop individual and group initiative and responsibility, self-reliance, courage, personal fitness, discipline and other desirable qualities of character through participation in a wide range of organized recreational, educational and civic activities under the leadership of qualified adult volunteers. Troop members work on developing their skills in camping, swimming, citizenship, communication, conservation, cooking, community living, first aid and a wide variety of other areas, and usually earn merit badges when they have demonstrated mastery of the skills that are required for a particular activity.
  • Sexually Transmitted Disease Screening (5)
    LF-4900.8000

    Sexually Transmitted Disease Screening

    LF-4900.8000

    Programs that identify individuals who have contracted gonorrhea, syphilis, genital herpes or other diseases that are spread by sexual contact and diagnose their conditions. The procedure includes visual examinations, blood tests and analyses of discharge or samples taken from lesions.
  • Soup Kitchens (2)
    BD-5000.8300

    Soup Kitchens

    BD-5000.8300

    Programs offered by churches, restaurants and other organizations that provide meals in a central location for people who lack the resources needed to buy and prepare food. The food may be distributed to people who line up for the meal or may be served to people seated in a dining hall setting, and participants rarely need to establish eligibility for the service.
  • Special Education Classes/Centers (3)
    HH-8000.8000

    Special Education Classes/Centers

    HH-8000.8000

    Programs that enroll exceptional learners for the majority of the school day in special classes or centers that are located on regular school sites and which group pupils who have similar instructional needs. Special classes and centers serve pupils who have intensive needs that cannot be met in a less restrictive learning environment.
  • Speech Therapy (6)
    LR-8000.8000-820

    Speech Therapy

    LR-8000.8000-820

    Programs that offer individual or group therapy sessions which focus on the remediation of specific articulation problems in which speech sounds are omitted, replaced by substitute sounds or distorted; voice problems in which pitch, loudness or quality of voice is affected; or stuttering.
  • Suicide Prevention Programs (3)
    RR-5150.5000-800

    Suicide Prevention Programs

    RR-5150.5000-800

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of suicide through a variety of educational interventions which have the objective of exploring alternatives to self-harm or self-destruction. Suicide prevention programs help people understand the nature of the problem; the risk factors and warning signs; and sources for treatment and support. Included are prevention programs that address specific target populations as well as those that are intended to reach the community at large. Delivery formats may include printed materials, videos or websites that address the subject and presentations in schools and agencies and to family groups.
  • TANF (1)
    NL-1000.8500

    TANF

    NL-1000.8500

    A state program with matching federal block grant funds administered by the county or the state under state guidelines that provides time-limited cash assistance for needy families with (or expecting) children as well as job preparation, work opportunities and access to supportive services such as child care which enable parents receiving assistance to leave the program and become self-sufficient. TANF, which ends the federal entitlement known as AFDC, creates a five-year lifetime limit on cash assistance for most adult recipients; requires that recipients be working or participating in a work-related activity within two years and cooperate with comprehensive child support enforcement efforts including paternity establishment; and contains special live at home and stay in school provisions for teenage parents. States have wide latitude in structuring their TANF programs and may obtain waivers which exempt them from specific federal requirements. Recipients may receive monthly checks or be given electronic benefit transfer (EBT) cards which allow them to access their cash benefits at automated teller machines (ATMs) or point of sale (POS) equipment that is located in grocery stores, banks and other commercial locations.
  • Terminal Illness Counseling (2)
    RP-1400.8000-850

    Terminal Illness Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-850

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance for individuals and families who are dealing with the reality of impending death and the stress; the intense feelings of depression, anger, anxiety, fear, guilt and grief; and the resultant strain on family and friendship relationships that arise when an individual is in the terminal stages of an illness.
  • Thrift Shops (14)
    BM-8500

    Thrift Shops

    BM-8500

    Organizations that offer new or secondhand furniture, appliances, clothing, toys and other material goods at lower than retail prices, and which often use the proceeds from sales to support other services to the community. Thrift shops accept direct donations from the public of new and reusable goods. Also included are other types of resale shops that sell secondhand but reusable musical instruments, salvaged building materials, office equipment, sports equipment, books, CDs and other material goods.
  • Wellness Programs (3)
    LH-2700.9500

    Wellness Programs

    LH-2700.9500

    Programs that offer individual and/or group sessions which assist participants to understand how their lifestyle impacts their physical and mental health and to develop personal practices that enhance their total well-being. Wellness programs are holistic and combine a variety of components which may include a general physical examination that is tailored to the individual's needs; an evaluation of the person's pattern of exercise, eating habits, sources of stress and other lifestyle elements that are potential risk factors; and the development and implementation of an individualized plan for prevention management and early intervention to optimize health and performance which may include physical fitness sessions, nutrition counseling, stress reduction techniques, biofeedback, practice in assuming responsibility for one's choices, and other specific measures for avoiding physical and mental health problems.
  • WIC (1)
    NL-6000.9500

    WIC

    NL-6000.9500

    A public health nutrition program administered by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service that provides nutrition education, nutritious foods, breastfeeding support and health care referrals for income-eligible pregnant or postpartum women, infants and children up to age five. Foster parents, grandparents, guardians and single fathers who have custody of their children may also be eligible to receive food assistance for children up to age five if they meet income guidelines. WIC provides specific foods to supplement the dietary needs of participants to ensure good health and development. Food packages typically include iron-fortified infant cereal, milk, cheese, eggs, whole grains, peanut butter, beans, fruits, vegetables and juice. Families can shop for WIC foods at most grocery stores using a WIC electronic transfer benefit (EBT) card or vouchers.