CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) RESOURCE CENTER Read More

Housing & Shelters

    Results: 32

  • Assisted Living Facilities (4)
    BH-8400.6000-060

    Assisted Living Facilities

    BH-8400.6000-060

    Residential facilities specially constructed or converted to combine housing and supportive services in a "homelike" environment with the goal of maximizing the individual functioning and autonomy of residents. Assisted living facilities generally have private apartment-style accommodations with walk in showers, wide doors for wheelchair access, emergency pull cord systems and other special amenities; and offer the individualized array of personal care services which will allow each resident to function as independently as possible. Services vary from facility to facility, but usually include three meals a day with special diets, as required; housekeeping and linen services; personal laundry; social and recreational activities; transportation to medical appointments, stores and community services; money management assistance; assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living; medication management and administration; therapy and pharmacy services; and wellness and exercise programs. Assisted living facilities may be licensed by the state or may not require a license depending on the area in which they are located.
  • Clothing (10)
    BM-6500.1500

    Clothing

    BM-6500.1500

    Programs that pay for or provide new or secondhand clothing. Included are clothing exchange programs.
  • Clothing Donation Programs (3)
    TI-1800.1500

    Clothing Donation Programs

    TI-1800.1500

    Programs that accept new or secondhand clothing, repair the items if necessary, and keep the clothing for use in their own programs, donate it to shelters and other community-based organizations for distribution to the people they serve, or sell it to raise money for agency programs.
  • Comprehensive Information and Referral (9)
    TJ-3000.1500

    Comprehensive Information and Referral

    TJ-3000.1500

    Programs that maintain information about the full range of human services and which function as the primary source of information about and linkage to human service providers in the community.
  • Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites (7)
    BD-5000.1500

    Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites

    BD-5000.1500

    Programs that provide hot meals on a regular basis primarily for older adults who may be at risk for nutritional deficits and social isolation without assistance. Congregate meals are often combined with recreational, educational and social activities, and programs may include access to health services and/or information. Some programs are also open to caregivers, spouses and/or adults with disabilities.
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (5)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for individuals, primarily women, who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women, where they are available.
  • Family Crisis Shelters (5)
    BH-1800.1500-200

    Family Crisis Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-200

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for certain members of or entire families who are involved in or at risk for child abuse or neglect. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services that are related to child abuse including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses (5)
    BD-1875.2000

    Food Banks/Food Distribution Warehouses

    BD-1875.2000

    Programs that gather, sort, store and distribute to participating charitable agencies, surplus food products and edible but unmarketable food that has been acquired from growers, grocers and other sources. Also included are the supermarket chains, food manufacturers, wholesalers, restaurant suppliers, agencies that organize food drives, government departments (e.g., the USDA) and other organizations that donate food on a regular basis to food banks and/or directly to food pantries, meal programs, homeless shelters and other human service agencies with food programs.
  • Food Pantries (25)
    BD-1800.2000

    Food Pantries

    BD-1800.2000

    Programs that acquire food products through donations, canned food drives, food bank programs or direct purchase and distribute the food to people who are in emergency situations. Some pantries deliver food to people whose disabilities or illnesses make it difficult for them to leave home.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP (1)
    NL-6000.2000

    Food Stamps/SNAP

    NL-6000.2000

    A federally-funded program administered locally by the county or the state that enables low-income and indigent households to obtain an electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card similar to a bank debit card which can be used in most grocery stores to purchase food. Approved households are entitled to purchase a designated amount of food utilizing their cards based on net income and household size. Benefits are generally available in an EBT account within 30 days from the date an application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits.
  • Geriatric Home Nursing (5)
    LT-2800.3100-250

    Geriatric Home Nursing

    LT-2800.3100-250

    Programs whose home health care services are provided by registered nurses who may have advanced training and who specialize in working with people who are elderly.
  • Home Delivered Meals (7)
    BD-5000.3500

    Home Delivered Meals

    BD-5000.3500

    Programs that prepare and regularly deliver meals to older adults, people with disabilities and others who have difficulties shopping and/or preparing food for themselves or traveling to a site where a meal is being served.
  • Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing (2)
    BH-8400.3000

    Homeless Permanent Supportive Housing

    BH-8400.3000

    Programs that provide affordable, community-based housing for individuals and families who have experienced long-term or chronic homelessness and have been diagnosed as having a physical or developmental disability, a severe mental illness, substance use disorder problems or HIV/AIDS; or are members of another designated group within the homeless population. Structures may include apartments, single-family houses, duplexes, group homes or single-room occupancy housing. Permanent supportive housing programs generally provide residents with the rights of tenancy under state or local landlord/tenant laws and are linked to services designed to meet residents' needs. Supportive services vary depending on the resident population. Most programs offer some type of case management and housing support, but may also offer more intensive mental health, substance use disorder, vocational, employment or other services which help promote independent living. Supportive services may be offered on-site or off-site, or be provided by a mobile service team and may be available to people with current housing who are at risk of becoming homeless.
  • Homeless Shelter (2)
    BH-1800.8500

    Homeless Shelter

    BH-1800.8500

    Programs that provide a temporary place to stay (usually three days to two weeks), generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy, for people who have no permanent housing. Also included are programs that provide motel vouchers for people who are homeless.
  • Homeless Youth (2)
    YV-3000.8000

    Homeless Youth

    YV-3000.8000

    Children or adolescents who have been abandoned by the adults responsible for their care or who have left their homes without notice or parental consent and who have no fixed place of residence.
  • Household Goods Donation Programs (4)
    TI-1800.3000

    Household Goods Donation Programs

    TI-1800.3000

    Programs that accept new or secondhand furniture, appliances, kitchenware, linens, cleaning supplies and other consumer products for use in the household, refurbish them if necessary, and keep them for use in their own programs, donate them to other community-based organizations for distribution to the people they serve, or sell them to raise money for agency programs.
  • Household Goods Vouchers (5)
    BM-3000.3000

    Household Goods Vouchers

    BM-3000.3000

    Programs that supply coupons that can be exchanged in designated thrift shops or nonprofit organizations for furniture, appliances, bedding and other household items.
  • Housing Authorities (5)
    BH-8300.3000

    Housing Authorities

    BH-8300.3000

    City, county, or state housing offices that provide information about eligibility for and vacancies in the subsidized housing properties that are under their jurisdiction. Housing authorities accept Section 8 applications, provide Section 8 vouchers, make approved Section 8 rental payments and administer public housing communities while in certain rural areas, the housing finance agency may play this role.
  • Independent Living Communities/Complexes (2)
    BH-7000.5100-330

    Independent Living Communities/Complexes

    BH-7000.5100-330

    Residential facilities, apartments and/or planned communities for older adults, people with disabilities or other populations that are available at market rates and designed to enable those who are eligible to have a form of independent living in a secure environment while sharing common interests and having access to supportive services and a range of activities designed to promote social contact among residents. Occupancy by families with children may be discouraged. Housing varies widely from simple apartments to high rise condominiums to single family detached housing to housing in a congregate setting; and units may be available on a purchase or rental basis. Support usually consists of "convenience services" which may include an on-site activities program, transportation, housekeeping and meals in a communal dining room. Residents who require additional support need to make their own arrangements for personal care, home health care or other in-home services. These facilities generally require no licensing.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing (2)
    BH-7000.4600-450

    Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600-450

    Privately owned rental housing that is made available to low-income individuals and families at reduced rates based on a contract between HUD or the state housing authority and the property owner. Subsidies are paid directly to the owner of the property who then rents units to income-eligible individuals and families. Also included are low-cost or below market rate housing that is operated or sponsored by religious or charitable organizations for the benefit of low-income individuals and families; and rental housing targeted to lower income households that has been purchased, rehabilitated or constructed by developers who are receiving a federal income tax credit under the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program or are participants in other similar affordable housing incentive programs. Some privately owned rental units that were developed or improved with public funds are also required to rent a designated number of units at reduced prices to people who meet low-income eligibility requirements until the federal or state loans are paid. Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations. Included are income-based rental housing where tenants pay rent that is geared to their income; as well as fixed below market rate rental housing where rent is lower than what people would normally pay renting the unit but is based on a specified percentage of the median income for the area rather than on a percentage of an individual's actual income, and tenants may have to be within a specified income range to live there. Rental amounts and the level of "affordability" may vary considerably among programs.
  • Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities (2)
    FT-1000.6600

    Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities

    FT-1000.6600

    Programs that provide assistance for individuals with disabilities who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law. Included are federally mandated programs that are part of the formal protection and advocacy system which includes Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights (PAIR) and the Client Assistance Program (CAP); and independent organizations that provide the same types of services. Protection and advocacy programs provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under federal and state laws, for all people with disabilities and endeavor to ensure full access to inclusive educational programs, financial entitlements, health care, accessible housing and productive employment opportunities. The programs maintain a presence in facilities that care for people with disabilities where they monitor, investigate and attempt to remedy adverse conditions. CAP agencies (many of which are housed within protection and advocacy offices) provide information and assistance for individuals seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act, including assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies.
  • Rent Payment Assistance (8)
    BH-3800.7000

    Rent Payment Assistance

    BH-3800.7000

    Programs that make rental payments for people who are at risk of eviction without assistance. Also included are rent supplement programs that provide assistance with ongoing monthly rental costs. Rent payment assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (2)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers (5)
    BH-7000.4600-700

    Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers

    BH-7000.4600-700

    A federally-supported, tenant-based housing program administered by local housing authorities that provides assistance in the form of vouchers that enable income-eligible families to find and lease approved privately owned housing where the landlord has agreed to enter into a contract with the housing authority and/or finance agency. Tenant-based assistance provides rental subsidies that move with a household into any qualifying housing within a certain area. The housing can be (and often is) private housing that may not have been built with the intention of accepting solely low-income tenants, but if the quality and cost of the unit fall within a specified range, it may qualify. Eligible households pay approximately 30% to 40% of their adjusted gross income for rent and the housing authority subsidizes the balance.
  • Senior Housing Information and Referral (5)
    BH-8500.8000

    Senior Housing Information and Referral

    BH-8500.8000

    Programs that maintain information about retirement residences, residential care facilities and nursing homes, and link older adults who are looking for alternative living options with appropriate independent or supervised living resources.
  • Sexual Assault Shelters (3)
    BH-1800.1500-800

    Sexual Assault Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-800

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have been victimized by rape and/or other forms of sexual assault. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and significant other counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to sexual assault including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Skilled Nursing Facilities (4)
    LL-6000.8000

    Skilled Nursing Facilities

    LL-6000.8000

    Health care facilities or distinct parts of hospitals that provide intensive nursing services as well as supportive services for people who require continuous inpatient care but who are not in an acute phase of an illness.
  • Soup Kitchens (2)
    BD-5000.8300

    Soup Kitchens

    BD-5000.8300

    Programs offered by churches, restaurants and other organizations that provide meals in a central location for people who lack the resources needed to buy and prepare food. The food may be distributed to people who line up for the meal or may be served to people seated in a dining hall setting, and participants rarely need to establish eligibility for the service.
  • Specialized Information and Referral (13)
    TJ-3000.8000

    Specialized Information and Referral

    TJ-3000.8000

    Programs that maintain information about community resources that are appropriate for a specific target group or human services sector (for example, youth programs or addiction services) and which link individuals who are in need of specialized services with appropriate resources and/or which provide information about community agencies and organizations that offer specialized services.
  • Street Outreach Programs (9)
    PH-8000

    Street Outreach Programs

    PH-8000

    Programs that are staffed by outreach workers who spend time with people who live on the street, build relationships with them, identify and address their immediate needs (e.g., crisis intervention, food, clean clothing, hygiene kits, blankets, someone to listen) and provide information about and linkage to longer-term forms of support such as shelter, counseling, drug and alcohol detoxification and rehabilitation, care/case management and, where applicable, family reunification services. Street outreach programs may be staffed by volunteers or peers who were formerly homeless; and may target special populations such as homeless youth at risk for sexual abuse or exploitation, veterans, or people with specific medical or mental health conditions, or be available to the larger homeless population.
  • Thrift Shops (14)
    BM-8500

    Thrift Shops

    BM-8500

    Organizations that offer new or secondhand furniture, appliances, clothing, toys and other material goods at lower than retail prices, and which often use the proceeds from sales to support other services to the community. Thrift shops accept direct donations from the public of new and reusable goods. Also included are other types of resale shops that sell secondhand but reusable musical instruments, salvaged building materials, office equipment, sports equipment, books, CDs and other material goods.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (7)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance use disorders, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.